Tag Archives: Symbols

A lily for Lily

A lily for Lily

According to the Headstones Symbols: Understanding Cemetery Symbolism site, “Lily means chastity, innocence and purity. A favored funeral flower of the Victorians. Joseph is often depicted holding a lily branch to indicate that his wife Mary was a virgin. In tradition, the first lily sprang forth from the repentant tears of Eve as she went forth from Paradise. The use of lilies at funerals symbolizes the restored innocence of the soul at death.” 

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The Art of the Hand-carved Gravestone

If you ever wanted to know what it takes to hand carve a tombstone, here’s a video showing how Dave Wheelock of Sandwich, Massachusetts carves an 18th-century style gravestone.

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Quick symbol guide to headstones

Symbols

Spring is almost here, and in anticipation of that glorious event, here’s a quick guide to some of the different religious symbols you may see on the various stones out there. Come to think of it, I believe I once spotted the symbol for the United Moravian Church somewhere and mistook it for a brotherhood symbol.

Happy Hunting.

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Tree of life, genealogy symbol, or both?

A Tree of Life carving

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March 13, 2015 · 05:30

Cemetery Traditions in Japan

Jizo statue

Many thanks to J. Matsumura for sending this excerpt my way. If you ever wondered about the reason behind the Jizo statues marking the graves of Japanese children, here’s an enlightening excerpt from the August 1, 1913 issue of the Enumclaw Herald:

“Among the Buddhists in Japan it is believed that the souls of children go farther after death to Sue-no-ha-wara (the stony river-bed) and there they remain until they reach maturity under the care of Jizobosatsu, who is represented as a priest with a long cane in one hand and ball in the other.

He is said to stand in the center of the Kawara, where he preaches to the children as they pile up stones, one for the salvation of their father, one for the mother, the third for brothers, the fourth for sisters and the fifth for their own salvation.

When night comes and the wind blows hard a gigantic evil spirit appears and with huge iron rod knocks down the heaps of stones which the children have made, and they are so frightened that they run to Jizo and hide themselves in the big sleeves of his Kimono, which have a miraculous way of increasing in size according to the number of children who seek refuge. Then the evil spirit disappears and the children begin again the work of heaping up the stones.

Passing these cemeteries in Japan, one sees tombs that have the image of Jizo carved upon them, as the parents take that way of going the special favor of Jizo for their children, and one will see little piles of stones built up by the parents and brothers and sisters of the children with the hope of helping in the tedious work of the little ones in the Kawara.”

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Gone but not forgotten

Gone_but_not-Forgotten

A carving of two hands clasped, one female, one male, signifies the loss of a spouse. Take a closer look at the details on the cuffs in order to tell which of the hands is masculine and which is feminine.

This style seems to have appeared most frequently in Victorian times.

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Sunbursts and a willow branch

Sunbursts and willow

Here’s a headstone memorializing the life of Matthew Cully (died 1813) that has a number of lovely sunburst carvings in addition to what appears to be a bent willow tree branch on the top. This headstone’s located in Milford, New York, in one of the most well-kept cemeteries I’ve ever had the pleasure to visit.

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